Order Hoarders

Nonfiction literary compositions

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Order Hoarders

Postby Hesperus » Tue May 17, 2016 4:33 pm

Order Hoarders: A Brief History of Some of the Many Occult Organizations Affiliated with Vampirism

by Hesperus (c) 2016

Given the supernatural nature of folkloric vampires and their association with the shadows, it’s unsurprising that so many self-identifying vampires subscribe to occult philosophies or that a number of new religious movements build on their various ideas of vampirism. Although several distinct groups have claimed to offer the “one true vampire religion” and sorting through the details of each poses the challenges inherent in any attempt to grasp the finer points of a group whose practices are largely kept secret, familiarity with the basics of these groups is of interest to those seeking a deeper knowledge of vampire spirituality and history. While hardly an exhaustive list or a complete review of the groups listed, this summary of various traditions related to the vampire subculture may serve as a brief introduction to the history of some of the spiritual movements affiliated with or influencing the community of self-identifying vampires.

Hermetic Orders
Some of the oldest known occult orders arose from the collision of the ancient Greek and ancient Egyptian cultures around the beginning of the Common Era.¹ Attributing their central philosophical doctrines to the Greek god Hermes Trismegistus, identified with the Egyptian god of wisdom, Thoth, contemporary Hermetic orders include the Freemasons, Rosicrucians, and the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn.² Valuing diverse belief and personal experience, Hermetic orders believe that absolute Divine truth manifests itself in all faiths, the singular source of which can be discovered with devoted study and direct participation in spiritual practices that ultimately culminate in once more becoming one with the Divine.³

One Hermetic Order, the Golden Dawn, was formally founded by Samuel Liddell Mathers, Dr. William Wynn Westcott and Dr. William Robert Woodman in Britain in 1888.⁴ Soon spreading throughout Western Europe, the United States and New Zealand, the order features initiatory rituals designed to gradually guide students to enlightenment.⁵ The details of the magical practices of the order were revealed to the public in part when Aleister Crowley published some of the Golden Dawn rituals in Equinox,⁶ and later in full by Dr. Francis Israel Regardie in his publication of The Golden Dawn.⁷

Although the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn’s central teachings did not focus on vampirism, the Order provided its students with documents describing first-hand accounts and practical insight into the application of its philosophy,⁸ one of which, Flying Roll V, describes several encounters by the author with people he identified as vampires for their tendency or ability to draw vital energy from others.⁹ Former member of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, Dion Fortune,¹⁰ went on to describe psychic vampires as energy parasites and instructed readers in methods of protecting against them in her book Psychic Self-Defense.¹¹

Ordo Templi Orientis (OTO)
The OTO has been active since its founding in 1895¹² and became highly visible under the leadership of Aleister Crowley, a former member of the Golden Dawn,¹³ beginning in 1922.¹⁴ Building on the esoteric traditions of earlier occult organizations like the Freemasons and Rosicrucians,¹⁵ the OTO came to distinguish itself under Crowley with the integration of his Thelemite philosophy,¹⁶ which contends that many religious traditions arise from universal truths and that individuals have a divine mandate to discover their higher purpose—their Will—and to conduct themselves accordingly. This Law of Thelema is typically summed up as “Do as thou wilt” and the many processes of discovering and employing that Will are referred to collectively as “Magick”.¹⁷

While not addressing vampirism directly in its core teachings, according to Michelle Belanger’s Introduction in Vampires in Their Own Words, Crowley’s version of sexual vampirism taught at high levels of the OTO may have contributed to some of the practices and philosophical beliefs of modern vampires.¹⁸ Furthermore, the OTO certainly inspired later organizations in both structure and philosophy.

Church of Satan (CoS)
Anton LaVey, who founded the CoS in 1966 in San Francisco, California,¹⁹ studied the works of Crowley and others affiliated with the OTO, but criticized them, suggesting that their philosophy relied on disingenuous justifications allowing them to explore “the darkside” without honestly and directly embracing their interests.²⁰ LaVey encouraged readers of his Satanic Bible to exercise their will magically for the purposes of self-empowerment with a philosophy of immediate self-indulgence²¹ that is fundamentally atheistic.²²

LaVey had a bleak view of “psychic vampires” which he defined in The Satanic Bible as “individuals who drain others of their vital energy” and which he went on to describe as emotionally manipulative.²³ The later statement, however, that “the Church of Satan does respect and appreciate” the Temple of the Vampire²⁴ supports the view that LaVey used the term “psychic vampire” to refer to people who engage in the unsavory behavior he described rather than those who actually identify as vampires or who practice vampirism as a sincere spiritual path.

Temple of Set (ToS)
One group the CoS certainly does not “respect and appreciate” is the Temple of Set.²⁵ The ToS was founded in 1975 by Michael Aquino, a former member of the CoS who was inspired by Crowley’s Thelemic principles²⁶ and who combined the CoS’s focus on openly embracing the goal of personal godhood with a more traditional sacred history crediting a higher power, namely the Egyptian god Set, with the origin of human consciousness.²⁷ Founded in California, the same state as the CoS from which it split over concerns regarding the LaVey’s “intentions to commercialize” Satanism,²⁸ the ToS includes a number of groups called Pylons that allow members around the globe to socialize and discuss their studies.²⁹ Members of the ToS work to enact their will magically with the ultimate goal of ascending to a higher state of being that transcends mortal limitations. While acknowledging the divinity of Set, Setians do not worship him per se, but rather strive to attain such divinity themselves.³⁰

The ToS includes several Orders—groups which focus on “specialized fields of study and research”—including the Order of the Vampyre.³¹ The Order of the Vampyre disavows any connection with the broader vampire community and specifically disallows blood-drinking and disagrees with a number of beliefs about psi-feeding common in the VC.³² The ToS’s idea of vampyrism, as explored within the Order of the Vampyre, is a magical state that “enables a natural and effortless exchange of Power from the lesser to the Greater”.³³

Temple House Sahjaza
Led primarily by Goddess Rosemary and founded in 1976, the group that would eventually come to be known as Temple House Sahjaza was initially a female-only coven³⁴ for vampyric witches³⁵ called the Black Rose Coven,³⁶ became the Z/n (Zenith/nadir) Society NYC in 1985,³⁷ and formally became House Sahjaza in 1998.³⁸ House Sahjaza is non-denominational and open to all genders and members are encouraged to explore their own spiritual paths.³⁹ While Sahjaza members practice diverse spiritual beliefs, they reserve their core teachings for those initiated into the House and all members share a common code of ethics.⁴⁰ Although many of their practices are only shared with the initiated, House Sahjaza is known for its rituals involving donor blood.⁴¹ One notable former member of House Sahjaza was Father Sebastiaan⁴² who would go on to found the OSV.

Temple of the Vampire (ToV)
After splitting from the Church of Satan to join the Temple of Set, George Smith (who also went by Lucas Martel and Nemo)⁴³ left the ToS to found the Temple of the Vampire in 1989 in the United States before it gradually drew an international membership.⁴⁴ The philosophy of the ToV has a great deal in common with that of the CoS, promoting self-worship and the attainment and exercise of personal power.⁴⁵ Members of the ToV also view themselves as predatory animals⁴⁶ not unlike the CoS’s assertion that man is just another animal⁴⁷ and in contrast to the ToS’s belief that man’s capacity for consciousness is special and divinely gifted.⁴⁸ Notably, the ToV does refer to and call on gods, describing them as past vampires who are no longer limited by physical forms and who can commune with living initiates.⁴⁹

The ToV’s introductory text, The Vampire Bible, describes basic techniques of drawing vital energy from others⁵⁰ but the ToV expressly forbids its members to physically drink blood.⁵¹ The Vampire Bible goes on to credit the Undead Gods with cultivating human civilization in order to increase the human population so that vampires would have a greater source of sustenance as well as creating all mainstream religions and posing as their gods to subjugate mankind.⁵²

Sanguinarium
Evolving from The Coven of Sabretooth founded in 1995 by Father Sebastian Todd and Father Vincent Orion—itself arising from a New York-based fangsmith company started in 1992⁵³—and incorporating the philosophies of House Sahjaza and what would soon become House Kheperu,⁵⁴ the Sanguinarium was formally established with the publication of the first edition of the Vampyre Almanac in 1998.⁵⁵ Initially drawing inspiration for its organizational structure from vampire fiction, renaissance festivals, and the underground fetish community,⁵⁶ the Sanguinarium originally attracted primarily individuals who identified with the vampire archetype but did not necessarily identify as sanguine or psychic vampires.⁵⁷

While the Sanguinarium’s beginnings may not have included a majority of need-based vampires, Joseph Laycock describes it as a sort of “midwife” of the modern vampire subculture, comparing it to the legacy of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn’s influence on later occult organizations.⁵⁸ The Sanguinarium, despite criticisms by self-identifying vampires regarding the prominent inclusion of vampire lifestylers, was a useful network of websites, businesses, organizations, and general resources that allowed vampires to connect, compare notes, and organize events.⁵⁹ Various vampire groups were invited to join the Sanguinarium umbrella as Houses,⁶⁰ further facilitating the exchange of information and other resources among self-identifying vampires.

House Kheperu
Michelle Belanger, one of the primary contributors to the Vampyre Almanac and the overall efforts to formalize the Sanguinarium, formed Ohio-based⁶¹ House Kheperu—which officially joined the Sanguinarium in 1999⁶²—a group of people with common past-life memories⁶³ who trace their spiritual connection to each other back to an intentional modification of their chakras in a past life that facilitates their awareness of and interaction with spiritual realms as well as causing a need for psychic energy from outside sources.⁶⁴ Although formal membership is limited to those recognized as re-embodied spiritual family members called Kheprians, House Kheperu recognizes others who apply their teachings as Kheretes.⁶⁵ The philosophy and practices of House Kheperu are open and available to both psychic and sanguine vampires⁶⁶ and places value on individual truth and diversity of thought.⁶⁷

Kheprian teachings regarding ethical psychic vampirism and psychic feeding techniques were made accessible to the public with the publication of Michelle Belanger’s The Psychic Vampire Codex, the contents of which had already strongly influenced the Sanguinarium⁶⁸ and which Belanger made freely available online,⁶⁹ significantly shaping the developing sense of what it meant to be a vampire in the vampire community at the time by presenting psychic vampires as not necessarily parasitic, but potentially as healers and natural parts of a universal balance.⁷⁰ Quickly spreading throughout the community, some vampire orders that believed feeding methods and other magical techniques should be known only to an elite few forbade their members from studying The Psychic Vampire Codex.⁷¹

Notably, although the Temple of the Vampire refused to exchange any findings on vampirism with Belanger, upon reading their Vampire Bible years later, she found that, although the philosophical and ethical principles held by the ToV were strikingly different than those of House Kheperu, the feeding techniques were nearly identical.⁷² Similarly, House Kheperu and the Temple of Set independently arrived at common beliefs, each from uncovered past-life memories, regarding the role of the Egyptian god Set in spiritually transforming others by altering their connection to the universe to facilitate the preservation of a sense of self that can survive physical death, both even employing some form of the Egyptian term “Kheperu”, meaning to become or transform.⁷³

Ordo Strigoi Vii (OSV)
The Sanguinarium, once a network of distinct vampire groups, gradually developed its own spiritual philosophy distinct from those of its associated Houses, leading to the establishment of the OSV, whose teachings were described in the publication V in 2003.⁷⁴ The OSV’s beliefs were later made more accessible with the publication of the Vampyre Sanguinomicon in 2010, which details how members can adopt an “immortal mindset” that will help them to avoid the “Second Death”, the loss of one’s sense of self including one’s memories after the death of one’s physical body,⁷⁵ thus retaining one’s experiences and overall personality after physical death and becoming a “Strigoi Morte”, a non-corporeal spirit that can provide guidance and inspiration to the living.⁷⁶ The philosophy and spiritual practices of the OSV may have been influenced by those of the CoS, the ToV, and the ToS, as contributing author to Vampyre Magick, Magister Maelle, identifies himself as a co-founder of the OSV and a former member of all three⁷⁷ and Father Sebastiaan acknowledges that Magister Dmitri’s experiences within the ToV contributed to some of the OSV’s terminology.⁷⁸

Although the OSV utilizes the vampire archetype and evolved from a network that included several vampire Houses, members of the OSV are not necessarily sanguine or psychic vampires;⁷⁹ the OSV explicitly disallows its members to drink blood and asserts that its version of vampyrism is a philosophy and spiritual tradition unrelated to any energy deficiency.⁸⁰ The OSV does, however, acknowledge other occult traditions and vampire-identifying groups as “Legacies” or “Tribes” including members of House Sahjaza, Kheprians, members of the ToS’s Order of the Vampyre, and members of the ToV.⁸¹

Voices of the Vampire Community (VVC)
Not all organizations founded by and for self-identifying vampires are fundamentally religious or spiritual in nature, as evidenced by the VVC, founded in 2006. The VVC includes at the time of this writing 130 members (three in memoriam) coming from over 15 countries around the world. With a diverse membership including psi-vampires, sanguine vampires, and donors, the VVC works with academia, general media, and law enforcement to provide reliable information and dispel misconceptions about self-identifying vampires. Drawing from this wide pool of contributors, who who were nominated and elected by existing VVC members based on their contributions to the vampire community, the VVC also works to facilitate cooperation and the constructive exchange of ideas and experiences among the community’s leaders without establishing a centralized governing body or imposing a single view of vampirism upon others.⁸² Although the VVC seeks to ease access to resources for the greater vampire community much as the Sanguinarium once did, the VVC does not require its members or those to whom it offers assistance to conform to any set of beliefs or to participate in any rituals.

Kemetic Order of Aset Ka
The central text of the Kemetic Order of Aset Ka, the Asetian Bible, was published by Luis Marques in 2007⁸³ although the Order claims ancient, even prehistoric origins.⁸⁴ The Order seems to be based in Oporto, Portugal⁸⁵ and the Asetian Bible’s author states that the text was “developed between Portugal and Egypt”.⁸⁶ Adherents of the teachings of the Asetian Bible practice a magickal tradition believed to be created and passed down by the Egyptian goddess Aset,⁸⁷ also commonly known as Isis,⁸⁸ with the goal of achieving higher states of consciousness and general spiritual evolution through energy manipulation.⁸⁹ Asetians strive to achieve this empowered state in part by uncovering their own past lives, dating back to ancient Egypt, thus proving to themselves their own spiritual immortality.⁹⁰ The Order of Aset Ka encourages not only personal attainment of godhood, but the acknowledgment of an external deity, Aset, as well,⁹¹ not unlike the ToS’s relationship with Set.

Asetians describe vampirism as a spiritual condition caused by an immortal non-human soul dwelling within a mortal human body.⁹² The Asetian philosophy asserts that vampires are able to feed on vital energy or blood interchangeably, as what Asetian vampires need is “Ka”, a primordial essence that permeates all life and can be accessed by those with magickal skill from many sources.⁹³ Asetians acknowledge House Kheperu’s belief in damaged chakras as the source of Kheprian vampirism, but assert that they do not qualify as vampires by the Asetian definition, as they are “humans with a damaged soul” rather than non-human vampiric souls occupying a human form.⁹⁴

Dark Nations
Founded in 2007⁹⁵ by House of the Dreaming members Khan and Madame X,⁹⁶ Dark Nations shares the interests of the VVC in facilitating intra-community communications, but focuses on organizations such as Houses within the community⁹⁷ including groups from all around the world.⁹⁸ Designed with the United Nations in mind,⁹⁹ Dark Nations includes over two dozen distinct community-related organizations and its administrators are themselves unaffiliated with any closed membership community groups in order to minimize bias in handling inter-group diplomacy.¹⁰⁰ Typifying its commitment to promoting understanding and respectful interaction, many of Dark Nations’ members offer counseling, mediation and general guidance to others in the vampire community.¹⁰¹



In addition to individual occultists carrying their experiences with past organizational affiliations with them into new orders and a majority of those orders explored above disavowing the greater vampire community in general and sanguinarians in particular, one key element frequently arose in many of these orders, namely Kemeticism.

Kemeticism
Many who utilize the vampire archetype or who incorporate their vampirism into their spiritual practices find Kemeticism, the adoption of ancient Egyptian religious beliefs or symbolism, empowering,¹⁰² and vampires aren’t alone. Hermes Trismegistus, source of divine wisdom for Hermeticists, is identified with the Egyptian god Thoth¹⁰³ and Crowley’s Book of the Law, cornerstone of the Thelemite philosophy that came to characterize the OTO, is filled with references to Egyptian gods.¹⁰⁴ When it comes to vampire-specific groups, Set of the ToS is, of course, an Egyptian deity, as is Aset of the Order of Aset Ka; the ToS,¹⁰⁵ the Kheprians,¹⁰⁶ and the OSV¹⁰⁷ all use some form of the Egyptian word “Kheperu” in their core teachings; and both House Kheperu¹⁰⁸ and the Order of Aset Ka¹⁰⁹ claim a lineage that dates back to a prehistoric spiritual transformation known as “Sep Tepy” taking place in Egypt. Perhaps most visibly, the Sanguinarium employed the symbol of the ankh,¹¹⁰ an Egyptian symbol for life and immortality.¹¹¹



Ronin
Joining an order or subscribing to the philosophy or religion of another group is by no means a requirement for self-identifying vampires. According to a 2007 survey by Suscitatio Enterprises LLC, a strong majority of members of the modern vampire community, 75.82%, are unaffiliated with any formal vampire organization.¹¹² These vampires are often referred to within the community as “Ronin”.¹¹³ During the early years of the Sanguinarium, Courts—collections of Houses and other vampire groups geographically close to each other that would regularly exchange information and socialize¹¹⁴—shunned Ronin and did not allow them to participate in Court activities including voting on issues that could impact all members of the local community, including Ronin.¹¹⁵ Ronin gradually became more accepted within the Court system in light of the invaluable contributions of individual Ronin to the establishment of New Jersey’s Court of the Iron Garden.¹¹⁶ One of those Ronin who blazed a trail for the inclusion of interested Ronin in Court activities, Madame X, went on to found House of the Dreaming, a “House of Ronin” that recognizes the value of Family as well as the importance of individuality and diversity, in 2000 with Vailen Moon.¹¹⁷ The House of the Dreaming certainly does not represent or include every otherwise unaffiliated member of the vampire community﹘most, after all, prefer to avoid associating with any formal vampire organization﹘and prides itself on carefully selecting its members.¹¹⁸ With the rise of the online vampire community (OVC), Ronin now have as strong a voice as any other member of the OVC.



As of March 15, 2011, Suscitatio Enterprises, LLC’s Vampire Community History Project included entries for 371 groups related to the vampire community.¹¹⁹ The small number explored here included those who identify as vampires because their souls are non-human, their chakras were altered many lives ago, they want to avoid the Second Death, or they just have some fundamental, perspective-shifting need that can only be met by donations from others and they may have no clue why. Clearly there are many ways to be a vampire and to express one’s experiences as such, and it’s no surprise that navigating the broader community can pose a challenge for newcomers and long-established participants alike. As the histories of these groups demonstrates, however, even those who vehemently disagree with the views of those who came before often draw inspiration from prior organizations’ ideas and work to fill needs revealed by the perceived shortcomings of past groups. Familiarizing oneself with the many forces that have shaped the modern vampire community is an important early step in determining how best to contribute something meaningful to it. Even when breaking entirely new ground, it’s helpful to learn from those with experience in laying foundations.


Notes

  1. Hermetic Fellowship, The Historical Background of Hermeticism, March 20, 2014, http://www.hermeticfellowship.org/HFHer ... Background (accessed May 8, 2016).
  2. Ibid.
  3. Hermetic Fellowship, The Beliefs of Hermeticism, March 20, 2014, http://www.hermeticfellowship.org/HFHer ... efs&Values (accessed May 8, 2016).
  4. Steven R. Cranmer and Albert Billings, A Brief History of the Golden Dawn, http://hermetic.com/gdlibrary/gd-faq.html#gdfaqII (accessed May 8, 2016).
  5. Ibid.
  6. Steven R. Cranmer and Albert Billings, What connection did Aleister Crowley have with the Golden Dawn?, http://hermetic.com/gdlibrary/gd-faq.html#gdfaqI08 (accessed May 8, 2016).
  7. Steven R. Cranmer and Albert Billings, Who was Israel Regardie?, http://hermetic.com/gdlibrary/gd-faq.html#gdfaqI07 (accessed May 8, 2016).
  8. Flying Rolls, http://www.hermeticgoldendawn.org/flyin ... ction.html (accessed May 8, 2016).
  9. V. H. Frater Resurgam, Flying Roll V: Thoughts on Imagination, http://www.golden-dawn.org/gd_fr5.htm (accessed May 8, 2016).
  10. Brian Haughton, Dion Fortune - In the Golden Dawn Tradition, http://www.mysteriouspeople.com/Dion_Fortune.htm (accessed May 8, 2016).
  11. Dion Fortune, Psychic Self-Defense, 25-28, http://jacquesricher.com/occult/psychic.pdf (accessed May 8, 2016).
  12. Steven R. Cranmer and Albert Billings, What connection did Aleister Crowley have with the Golden Dawn?, http://hermetic.com/gdlibrary/gd-faq.html#gdfaqI08 (accessed May 8, 2016).
  13. Ibid.
  14. Sabazius and AMT, O.T.O. Under Crowley, http://oto-usa.org/oto/history/#crowley (accessed May 8, 2016).
  15. Sabazius and AMT, History, http://oto-usa.org/oto/history/ (accessed May 8, 2016).
  16. Sabazius and AMT, O.T.O. Under Crowley, http://oto-usa.org/oto/history/#crowley (accessed May 8, 2016).
  17. US Grand Lodge Ordo Templi Orientis, Theology, http://oto-usa.org/thelema/theology/ (accessed May 8, 2016).
  18. Michelle Belanger, ed., Vampires in Their Own Words: An Anthology of Vampire Voices, “Introduction” (Woodbury, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 2007), xix.
  19. United States Army, “Religious Requirements and Practices of Certain Selected Groups. A Handbook for Chaplains,” extracted from Department of the Army Pamphlet No. 165-13 (1978), http://www.churchofsatan.com/doa-pamphlet-no165-13.php (accessed May 14, 2016).
  20. Eugene Robinson, “Anton LaVey,” Birth of Tragedy, no. 4 (November 1986 - January 1987), http://www.churchofsatan.com/interview- ... ragedy.php (accessed May 8, 2016).
  21. Blanche Barton, Church of Satan History: The Church of Satan, http://www.churchofsatan.com/cos-church-of-satan.php (accessed May 8, 2016).
  22. Church of Satan, F.A.Q. Fundamental Beliefs, http://www.churchofsatan.com/faq-fundam ... eliefs.php (accessed May 8, 2016).
  23. Anton Szandor LaVey, The Satanic Bible (New York: Avon Books, 1969), 56-60.
  24. Church of Satan, Satanic Sources - Societies, http://www.churchofsatan.com/sources-societies.php (accessed May 8, 2016).
  25. Peter H. Gilmore, Pretenders to the Throne: Regarding the Temple of Set, http://www.churchofsatan.com/pretenders ... throne.php (accessed May 8, 2016).
  26. Gabriel Roberts, The Devil’s Advocate: An Interview with Dr. Michael Aquino, http://disinfo.com/2013/09/devils-advoc ... el-aquino/ (accessed May 8, 2016).
  27. Temple of Set, General Information and Admissions Policies, https://xeper.org/pub/pub_gil.html (accessed May 8, 2016).
  28. United States Army, “Temple of Set” in Religious Requirements and Practices of Certain Selected Groups. A Handbook for Chaplains (2002), 13, http://alleeshadowtradition.com/pdf/arm ... ndbook.pdf (accessed May 16, 2016).
  29. Ibid., 14.
  30. Temple of Set, General Information and Admissions Policies, https://xeper.org/pub/pub_gil.html (accessed May 8, 2016).
  31. Temple of Set, Structure: Temple Fuctions, https://xeper.org/pub/pub_structure.html#orders (accessed May 8, 2016).
  32. Lilith Aquino and William T. Butch, Order of the Vampyre, https://xeper.org/ovampyre/ (accessed May 8, 2016).
  33. Ibid.
  34. Joseph Laycock, Vampires Today: The Truth About Modern Vampirism (Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers, 2009), 112.
  35. Temple House Sahjaza’s Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/TempleHouseSahjaza/info/ (accessed May 8, 2016).
  36. Goddess Rosemary, “Temple House Sahjaza,” in Gotham Vampyre Archives: The Anthology, 2nd edition, eds. Lord Shaolin Asura-MacPhee and Sir Traveler P. Asura-MacPhee (Pro Rege Productions, 2014), 74.
  37. Tony Sokol, “Daily Offbeat Vampire House Profile: Temple House Sahjaza, an Exclusive Interview with Goddess Rosemary,” Daily Offbeat, October 31, 2014, https://thegraveyardpress.wordpress.com ... -off-beat/ (accessed May 8, 2016).
  38. Temple House Sahjaza’s Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/TempleHouseSahjaza/info/ (accessed May 8, 2016).
  39. Sokol, “Daily Offbeat Vampire House Profile: Temple House Sahjaza, an Exclusive Interview with Goddess Rosemary,” https://thegraveyardpress.wordpress.com ... -off-beat/ (accessed May 8, 2016).
  40. Temple House Sahjaza’s Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/TempleHouseSahjaza/info/ (accessed May 8, 2016).
  41. Jerico DeAngelo, “Goddess Rosemary - Mother High Priestess - Temple Sahjaza.” YouTube video, 9:23. Posted August 30, 2014. https://youtu.be/1jVksJw0mLY (accessed May 8, 2016).
  42. Laycock, Vampires Today, 112.
  43. John Edgar Browning, “Temple of the Vampire,” in The World Religions and Spirituality Project (2011), https://www.academia.edu/17631703/_Temp ... niversity_ (accessed May 8, 2016).
  44. Temple of the Vampire, History of the Temple, http://templeofthevampire.com/?page_id=19 (accessed May 8, 2016).
  45. Temple of the Vampire, The Vampire Creed, http://templeofthevampire.com/?page_id=186 (accessed May 8, 2016).
  46. Ibid.
  47. LaVey, The Satanic Bible, 25.
  48. Temple of Set, General Information and Admissions Policies, https://xeper.org/pub/pub_gil.html (accessed May 8, 2016).
  49. Temple of the Vampire, The Vampire Bible, “The Calling of the Undead Gods” (Temple of the Vampire, 1989).
  50. Temple of the Vampire, The Vampire Bible, “The Secret Methods of Vampirism” (Temple of the Vampire, 1989).
  51. Temple of the Vampire, Legal, http://templeofthevampire.com/?page_id=962 (accessed May 8, 2016).
  52. Temple of the Vampire, The Vampire Bible, “The Coming Apocalypse” (Temple of the Vampire, 1989).
  53. Lord Shaolin Z. Asura-MacPhee, Lord “O” MacPhee Orion, and Lord Wolf Malkavia, “Clan Sabretooth: History and Traditions of the Gotham Halo Vampyre Community,” in Gotham Vampyre Archives: The Anthology, 2nd edition, eds. Lord Shaolin Asura-MacPhee and Sir Traveler P. Asura-MacPhee (Pro Rege Productions, 2014), 14.
  54. Michelle Belanger, The Psychic Vampire Codex, with a foreword by Father Sebastiaan (San Francisco, CA: Weiser Books, 2004), xii.
  55. Ibid., 262.
  56. Ibid., 20.
  57. Ibid., p. 21
  58. Laycock, Vampires Today, 101.
  59. Sanguinarius, Terminology and Lingo, http://www.sanguinarius.org/terminology/#Sanguinarium (accessed May 8, 2016).
  60. Laycock, Vampires Today, 98.
  61. Suscitatio Enterprises, LLC, Real Vampire Community Resource & Link Directory (2011), 21, http://www.suscitatio.com/RealVampireCo ... ay2011.pdf (accessed May 16, 2016).
  62. Belanger, Psychic Vampire Codex, 32.
  63. Michelle Belanger, Our Stance on Reincarnation, http://kheperu.org/stance-reincarnation/ (accessed May 8, 2016).
  64. Father Sebastiaan, Vampyre Sanguinomicon: The Lexicon of the Living Vampire, with a foreword by Konstantinos (San Francisco, CA: Weiser Books, 2010), 48-49.
  65. Michelle Belanger, The Foundation of the Kherete, http://kheperu.org/foundation-kherete/ (accessed May 8, 2016).
  66. Ibid.
  67. Michelle Belanger, Who We Are, http://kheperu.org/who-we-are/ (accessed May 8, 2016).
  68. Belanger, Psychic Vampire Codex, xii.
  69. Ibid., 34.
  70. Ibid., 41.
  71. Ibid., 40.
  72. Ibid., 27.
  73. Michelle Belanger, Kheperu and the Temple of Set, http://kheperu.org/kheperu-temple-set/ (accessed May 8, 2016).
  74. Belanger, Psychic Vampire Codex, 263.
  75. Father Sebastiaan, Vampyre Sanguinomicon, 203.
  76. Ibid., 209
  77. Father Sebastiaan, Vampyre Magick: The Grimoire of the Living Vampire, with a foreword by Michael W. Ford (San Francisco, CA: Weiser Books, 2012), xviii.
  78. Father Sebastiaan, Vampyre Sanguinomicon, 49.
  79. Father Sebastian, Three Different Types of Vampires, http://www.sanguinarium.net/index.php?t ... tiaan.125/ (accessed May 5, 2016).
  80. Ibid.
  81. Father Sebastiaan, Vampyre Sanguinomicon, 45.
  82. Voices of the Vampire Community, Voices of the Vampire Community, http://www.veritasvosliberabit.com/vvc.html (accessed on May 12, 2016).
  83. Kemetic Order of Aset Ka, Asetian Bible, http://www.asetka.org/AsetianBible.shtml (accessed May 8, 2016).
  84. Kemetic Order of Aset Ka, Tradition, http://www.asetka.org/tradition.shtml (accessed May 8, 2016).
  85. Suscitatio Enterprises, LLC, Real Vampire Community Resource & Link Directory (2011), 32, http://www.suscitatio.com/RealVampireCo ... ay2011.pdf (accessed May 16, 2016).
  86. Kemetic Order of Aset Ka, Asetian Bible, http://www.asetka.org/AsetianBible.shtml (accessed May 8, 2016).
  87. Kemetic Order of Aset Ka, Tradition, http://www.asetka.org/tradition.shtml (accessed May 8, 2016).
  88. Joyce Tyldesley, “Isis,” in Encylopaedia Britannica, http://www.britannica.com/topic/Isis-Egyptian-goddess (accessed May 8, 2016).
  89. Kemetic Order of Aset Ka, Tradition, http://www.asetka.org/tradition.shtml (accessed May 8, 2016).
  90. Ibid.
  91. Ibid.
  92. Kemetic Order of Aset Ka, Vampirism, http://www.asetka.org/vampirism.shtml (accessed May 8, 2016).
  93. Ibid.
  94. Ibid.
  95. The Dark Nations’ Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/TheDarkNationsPublicPage/info (accessed May 16, 2016).
  96. Yami Hikari, The Quarterly, March 2011, http://houseofthedreaming.org/reports/032011.htm (accessed May 16, 2016).
  97. Ibid.
  98. The Dark Nations, Brethren List - 2014, https://www.facebook.com/notes/851133978235130/ (accessed May 16, 2016).
  99. Hikari, The Quarterly, March 2011, http://houseofthedreaming.org/reports/032011.htm (accessed May 16, 2016).
  100. The Dark Nations’ Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/TheDarkNationsPublicPage/info (accessed May 16, 2016).
  101. The Dark Nations, Brethren List - 2014, https://www.facebook.com/notes/851133978235130/ (accessed May 16, 2016).
  102. Father Sebastiaan, Vampyre Magick, 28.
  103. Hermetic Fellowship, The Historical Background of Hermeticism, March 20, 2014, http://www.hermeticfellowship.org/HFHer ... Background (accessed May 8, 2016).
  104. US Grand Lodge Ordo Templi Orientis, Theology, http://oto-usa.org/thelema/theology/ (accessed May 8, 2016).
  105. Don Webb, Xeper: The Eternal Word of Set, https://xeper.org/pub/pub_dw_xeper.html (accessed May 8, 2016).
  106. Belanger, Psychic Vampire Codex, 31.
  107. Father Sebastiaan, Vampyre Sanguinomicon, 21.
  108. Michelle Belanger, Kheperu and the Temple of Set, http://kheperu.org/kheperu-temple-set/ (accessed May 8, 2016).
  109. Kemetic Order of Aset Ka, The Order, http://www.asetka.org/order.shtml (accessed May 16, 2016).
  110. Laycock, Vampires Today, 98.
  111. “Ankh,” in New World Encyclopedia, http://www.newworldencyclopedia.org/entry/Ankh (accessed May 8, 2016).
  112. Suscitatio Enterprises LLC, “Question 262: Are you a member of a Vampire House, Clan, Coven, Haven, Order, or Court?” in Vampirism and Energy Work Research Study: Examination of Sample Response Data (2007), http://www.suscitatio.com/images/348_262GraphNegUR.jpg (accessed May 8, 2016).
  113. Laycock, Vampires Today, 84.
  114. Belanger, Psychic Vampire Codex, 256.
  115. Tony Sokol, “Daily Offbeat Vampire House Profile: House of the Dreaming, An Exclusive Interview with Madame X,” Daily Offbeat, December 6, 2015, https://deyliveaccestv.wordpress.com/20 ... adame-x-2/ (accessed May 8, 2016).
  116. Madame X and Trismegistus, The New Jersey Iron Garden, Reclaiming the Flame that Nourishes the Seeds, https://www.facebook.com/notes/madame-x ... 6398639491 (accessed May 8, 2016).
  117. Sokol, “Daily Offbeat Vampire House Profile: House of the Dreaming, An Exclusive Interview with Madame X,” https://deyliveaccestv.wordpress.com/20 ... adame-x-2/ (accessed May 8, 2016).
  118. Ibid.
  119. Suscitatio Enterprises, LLC, Vampire Community History Project, http://www.suscitatio.com/projects/vamp ... oject.html (accessed May 12, 2016).
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